Skip
Go to main menu
Go to search
Go to left menu
Go to main contents
Go to bottom
Hold down Ctrl and + to make font size bigger or Ctrl and – to make it smaller.
Use the Cmd key if you have a Mac.
Print Print    Report error Report error      

Dictionary

Do you want to know what a petition resolution is or what is meant by duty of disclosure? Here is a list of explanations of terms that are frequently used in the Norwegian Parliament.

 

Choose a letter

P

pairing

an informal arrangement whereby a Member of one party agrees with a Member of an opposing party not to attend a particular sitting or vote. This system ensures that the proportional relationship between the parties is maintained during a vote.

parliamentarianism (parliamentary rule)

system of government whereby the Government is accountable to the national assembly (in Norway, the Storting). The Storting can force the government to resign through a vote of no confidence.

parliamentary leader

chair of a party group in the Storting.

parliamentary press club

the press organization in the Storting, the Storting’s press gallery.

parliamentary question

question asked at Question Time. Oral questions are those questions that are asked at the first, oral part of Question Time. Ordinary questions are those that are submitted to the cabinet minister in advance, and which are answered during ordinary Question Time.

parliamentary term

The Storting is elected for four years at a time. A parliamentary term is the four-year term of office of a Storting.

party group

all the Members of the same political party belong to a party group in the Storting.

party manifesto

summary of a political party’s standpoints on different issues; a presentation of the party’s policies.

petition resolution

decision made in the Storting that begins as follows: "The Storting asks the Government... "

plenary Storting

full assembly of the Storting for a sitting. Until 1 October 2009, the Storting divided into two chambers, the Odelsting and the Lagting, when dealing with legislation. Now, all business is dealt with by the Storting in plenary session.

preparatory Council of State

informal meeting of the Government to clarify the matters that will be submitted to the King in Council.

prerogative

(from the Latin: the one who asks first) exclusive rights of an individual, usually used to refer to the Royal Prerogative. The word was formerly used to refer to the privileges that only the King had. In keeping with the reduction in personal royal power in Norway over the last two centuries, the word now has limited significance, and is most commonly used to describe something that only the Government (King in Council) has the authority to decide, not the Storting. An example of this is administration of the Church.

Presidium

when the Storting constitutes itself, it elects a President and five Vice Presidents. These six individuals collectively constitute the Storting’s Presidium. The Presidium is responsible for planning and administering the business of the Storting in accordance with the premises of the Constitution and the Storting’s Rules of Procedure. The President of the Storting holds the highest public position in Norway after the King.

Private Member’s Bill

Bill submitted by a Member of the Storting. All Members may prepare Private Member’s Bills to be considered by the Storting. The Norwegian abbreviation used for such Bills is representantforslag L.

Private Member’s Motion

Motion for decision submitted by a Member of the Storting. All Members may prepare Private Member’s Motions to be considered by the Storting. The Norwegian abbreviation used for such motions is representantforslag S.

proceedings on the Fiscal Budget

work on the Fiscal Budget. This is the Storting’s most important responsibility besides legislation and scrutiny of the Government and public administration.

proportional representation

the electoral system whereby mandates (seats) are divided between the parties (electoral lists) in relation to the proportion of the total vote they receive. This system has been used in Norway since 1920.

proposed amendment to the Constitution

Article 112 of the Constitution determines that proposed amendments to the Constitution must be submitted during the first three yours of a parliamentary term, and must be dealt with during the first, second or third year of the following term. Consequently, there will always be a general election between the proposed amendment and the decision. By doing this, the electorate is given the opportunity to express its view.

Proposition to the Odelsting (historical term)

legislative Bill sent by the Government to the Odelsting for consideration. The system of the Odelsting and Lagting was abolished as of 1 October 2009. Propositions to the Odelsting have now been replaced by Propositions to the Storting (Bill).

Proposition to the Storting (Bill and Resolution)

proposal from the Government for the Enactment of a Bill, on ordinary matters and issues relating to the budget (Resolutions to the Storting), which the Storting must make a decision on. Abbreviated in Norwegian to prop. LS.

Proposition to the Storting (Bill)

legislative bill sent by the Government to the Storting for consideration. Until 1 October 2009, the term used was Proposition to the Odelsting. Then, the Storting divided into two chambers, the Odelsting and the Lagting, when dealing with legislation. Now, all business is dealt with by the Storting in plenary session. Abbreviated in Norwegian to prop. L.

Proposition to the Storting (historical term)

proposal from the Government on a matter that the Storting must make a decision on. Propositions always contain a preworded document for the Storting to vote on. As of 1 October 2009, the new term for this is Proposition to the Storting (Resolution).

Proposition to the Storting (Resolution)

proposal from the Government for a resolution on ordinary matters and issues relating to the budget (Resolution of the Storting), which the Storting must make a decision on. Abbreviated in Norwegian to prop. S.

public opinion

the prevailing view that ordinary people have about a particular subject.

Q

Question Time

a sitting where Members can put questions to cabinet ministers; usually held every Wednesday. During oral Question Time, ministers are expected to give oral answers to questions that they have not heard in advance. Usually two to three ministers are asked to attend. During ordinary Question Time, answers are given to questions that Members have submitted by the previous Friday at the latest, and which, therefore, ministers have had the opportunity to prepare.

quorum (be a quorum)

for votes on ordinary matters, over half of the Members must be present, while two-thirds must be present for votes on proposed amendments to the Constitution.

R

recommendation

after a committee has considered a matter, it submits a written recommendation that states the views of the committee and proposes a decision. After that, the recommendation is dealt with in the Storting.

Recommendation to the Storting

the committee’s recommendations on ordinary matters and issues relating to the budget.

Recommendation to the Storting (Bill)

the committee’s recommendations on legislative matters.

referendum

all those entitled to vote take a standpoint by voting on a specific issue or a specific political question.

reply

after the main speech in a debate, there may be an exchange of remarks. This gives Members the opportunity to comment on the speech, and the main speaker the chance to reply to each speaker in turn.

Report to the Odelsting (historical term)

a report from the Government to the Odelsting, used by the Government on rare occasions to withdraw a Bill that it did not wish to be considered. The system of the Odelsting and Lagting was abolished as of 1 October 2009. Reports to the Odelsting have now been replaced by Reports to the Storting.

Report to the Storting

orientations of the Storting by the Government on various matters that the Government wishes the Storting to consider. Reports to the Storting are used when the Government wishes to raise a matter in the Storting without a draft resolution. It is also used when the Government wishes to withdraw a Bill. Until 1 October 2009 the term Report to the Odelsting was used when the Government wished to withdraw a Bill, and Report to the Storting was used when the Government wished to orientate the Storting on various aspects of state activities. In many parts of the English speaking world, both kinds of report are referred to as white papers.

representative government (democracy)

representative democracy: the people elect representatives to act on their behalf, protect their interests and answer to the electorate at the following election. Direct democracy: the people may take a standpoint by voting on a specific issue, as in a referendum.

resolution (decision)

provision. Matters dealt with in the Storting are always concluded by means of a decision (or resolution). Decisions appear in the official report of the debate and the vote in the Chamber. Under the former legislative process, after a Bill was dealt with, resolutions from the Odelsting were written in a decision in the Odelsting (Besl. O). The system of the Odelsting and Lagting was abolished as of 1 October 2009. Bills must now be considered twice by a plenary Storting before they can be passed.

revised budget

all amendments and supplementary appropriations to the Fiscal Budget that are approved during any given fiscal year, as well as all draft amendments are dealt with at the end of the spring session.

right of initiative

a proposal to the Storting must be put forward in one of two ways: either by the Government in the form of a Proposition to the Storting, or by an individual Member of the Storting in the form of a Private Member’s Bill.

Royal Assent

the King in Council gives his approval to the Enactment of a Bill adopted by the Storting with his signature, and the Prime Minister countersigns.

Rules of Procedure

the rules that govern the proceedings of the Storting and many aspects of the internal running of the Storting and its proceedings.

The Storting's Administration
N-0026 Oslo
Tel. + 47 23 31 30 50

The Storting's
Information Service
Tel. +47 23 31 33 33

 

Editor-in-chief: Eli Pauline Fiskvik
Web Editor: Lars Henie Barstad